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Thinking about NAEP in Colorado and the Denver Public Schools

We believe in thanking our sources! This post was sourced from the following blog/website: http://dangerouslyirrelevant.org/2022/10/thinking-about-naep-in-colorado-and-the-denver-public-schools.html

The following is a new blog post related to education and teaching and relevant to our website visitors. The blog post is not based on the opinions or values of our company but is related to education and teaching, so we wanted to share it with YOU! If you ever have any questions please let us know. Now… on to the post!

[this blog post is a follow-up response to the Twitter exchange with Van Schoales posted below]

2022 10 26 Van Schoales 01

2022 10 26 Van Schoales 02

2022 10 26 Van Schoales 03

Hi Van.

Although I’ve admired your work for years, you and I have never met, which means that we don’t have a relationship to lean into. Seth Godin reminds me that ‘if your audience isn’t listening, it’s your fault, not theirs.’ So please take this post as a very-public apology for whatever anger or defensiveness I sparked by my tweet. I’m sure that it could have been worded more artfully, and I regret not phrasing it in a way that maybe would have been received better. I offer this longer-form blog post as an attempt to bypass the lack of nuance available in 280 Twitter characters. I tend to do much of my thinking out loud in front of others, because their feedback makes me smarter.

I don’t know if you had a chance to read my previous blog post, Much ado about NAEP, but I tried to make two key points. The first was that the timing of the March 2022 NAEP tests should give us pause when interpreting the results. Most educators in America probably would tell us that, as difficult as the 2020-2021 school year was, the 2021-2022 year was even tougher. Kids and families still were dealing with incredible trauma, children showed us daily in classrooms (or by their absences) that they needed more support, and we didn’t do a great job of effectively serving large numbers of our young people. Then we had another big COVID spike right before the NAEP administration, and we have absolutely no idea how that impacted student test-takers except that probably a whole bunch of them (and their families) were ill, absent, struggling, etc. during the months that immediately preceded the test. We also know that these things were most true for our least-resourced children. All of this together feels like a reason to take the 2022 NAEP results not just with a grain but a giant boulder of salt. It’s difficult enough in normal times to help our students feel motivated for standardized tests. It’s even tougher given the March 2022 context and when NAEP results don’t mean anything to students personally.

The second point that I tried to make was that ‘Proficient’ on NAEP doesn’t mean what most folks think it does. To quote Tom Loveless, former director of the Brown Center on Education Policy at the Brookings Institution, in most states the Proficient label is “significantly above” what most state policymakers and assessments deem as ‘grade level,’ and the more accurate NAEP proficiency level for most states would be closer to Basic. This is rarely if ever mentioned in media coverage of NAEP results. Accordingly, most people tend to interpret ‘proficient’ in the ordinary sense of the word rather than in an aspirational sense, which is why I mention it whenever I think it is relevant (e.g., in my tweet). As I said in my blog post post, we can have some interesting discussions about whether Basic or Proficient is the right NAEP target for states, but we should at least recognize that Proficient is very aspirational in most parts of the country.

Here in Colorado, about 75% of 4th graders met the Basic NAEP standard in math for 2022, and about 36% met the Proficient standard. In 8th grade, about 63% of Colorado students met the Basic NAEP standard in math in 2022, and about 28% of students met the Proficient standard. Those results are essentially equivalent to the 2022 national NAEP averages for math. For reading, about 68% of Colorado 4th graders met the Basic NAEP standard in 2022, and about 38% met the Proficient standard. For 8th grade, about 73% of students met the Basic NAEP standard for 2022 in reading, and about 34% met the Proficient standard. Colorado students’ NAEP results in reading were a few percentage points higher than the 2022 national averages. As many have noted, all of the scores for both Colorado and the nation are down from 2019, which is to be expected.

In my blog post, I also quoted Loveless’ statement that, because the NAEP Proficient standard is so aspirational, “If high school students are required to meet NAEP proficient to graduate from high school, large numbers will fail. If middle and elementary school students are forced to repeat grades because they fall short of a standard anchored to NAEP proficient, vast numbers will repeat grades.” [emphasis added]. We also have evidence that similar percentages of students in nominally higher-performing countries also would have trouble meeting the NAEP Proficient mark. NCES has done the work of mapping Colorado’s state standards for proficiency to NAEP equivalent scores. For math, Colorado’s standard is well above NAEP Proficient in 4th grade and close to Proficient in 8th grade. For reading, Colorado’s standard is much closer to Proficient than Basic in both 4th and 8th grade. Colorado’s standards clearly are more aspirational than those of most other states. Accordingly, fewer Colorado students will be deemed ‘at grade level’ than if our benchmarks were set closer to those elsewhere.

All of which brings us to the concerns that you note in the Denver Public Schools (DPS). DPS is one of 26 urban districts that was sampled in 2022 and, as you stated at DPS Boardhawk, results were worse than for Colorado and for the nation as a whole. DPS’ 4th grade math, 8th grade math, and 8th grade reading results all were essentially equivalent to the large city averages. DPS’ 4th grade reading results were generally a few percentage points higher than the large city averages. Enormous equity gaps exist across student subcategories and, unfortunately, NAEP noted that the 2022 performance gaps are not significantly different from those of 2017. Here is a more-detailed breakdown for DPS in a few categories (click on the links to see these tables):

  • 4th grade math
    • White students: 92% Basic, 62% Proficient
    • Black students: 49% Basic, 12% Proficient
    • Hispanic students: 48% Basic, 13% Proficient
    • School lunch not eligible: 77% Basic, 47% Proficient
    • School lunch eligible: 48% Basic, 10% Proficient
  • 8th grade math
    • White students: 81% Basic, 53% Proficient
    • Black students: 41% Basic, 11% Proficient
    • Hispanic students: 40% Basic, 10% Proficient
    • School lunch not eligible: 66% Basic, 35% Proficient
    • School lunch eligible: 38% Basic, 10% Proficient
  • 4th grade reading
    • White students: 84% Basic, 63% Proficient
    • Black students: 46% Basic, 14% Proficient
    • Hispanic students: 37% Basic, 14% Proficient
    • School lunch not eligible: 72% Basic, 48% Proficient
    • School lunch eligible: 36% Basic, 11% Proficient
  • 8th grade reading
    • White students: 88% Basic, 58% Proficient
    • Black students: 54% Basic, 15% Proficient
    • Hispanic students: 52% Basic, 16% Proficient
    • School lunch not eligible: 76% Basic, 42% Proficient
    • School lunch eligible: 51% Basic, 16% Proficient

Yikes! Those performance gaps are both troubling and persistent! They’re also similar to the other large city districts that were sampled, better than some and worse than others. Denver basically is in the middle of the pack for the 2022 NAEP sample of large city school districts.

To quote my own tweet, these performance “divides continue to be of concern.” Like you, I believe that DPS should be extremely transparent about those performance gaps. Also like you, I hope that DPS identifies publicly some concrete plans and actions to remedy its existing equity issues. Additionally, I’m cognizant of the difference between NAEP performance gaps and NAEP performance levels (which is what I was trying to say, albeit artlessly, in my tweet). If Colorado makes it harder for students to be deemed ‘proficient’ than in most other states, of course we’re going to say, “look, fewer kids are proficient!” That’s how we set up the system in the first place (and, once again, we can have a rich discussion about where the line should be set for proficiency). We’re also probably going to say that fewer students are ‘proficient’ in a large urban school system because, sadly, that’s basically the pattern that we see in big city school districts all across the country. Equity gaps are large and persistent in America for students of color, who live in poverty, whose primary language isn’t English, or who have a disability, and the past couple of decades of school reform haven’t done much to alter those. DPS isn’t doing great on these fronts, but it’s not an outlier either.

You said in your tweet that I should be “outraged by Black and Latinx proficiency levels.” Am I – and, without speaking for them, probably my colleagues at the University of Colorado Denver – outraged about proficiency gaps? Yes, of course. Just like you, we also care about equity and we all are fighting for historically-marginalized children across a variety of fronts. Am I personally outraged about proficiency levels? Less so, given the fact that Colorado decided to set a much higher bar than most other states. ‘Proficiency’ is a politically-determined label, not a context-free indicator. If DPS was in most states in America, we would say that 41% of its Black students were ‘at grade level’ in 8th grade math instead of 11%. That number is still terrible, particularly compared to their White student peers, but it’s not “1 in 10” either. Again, if Colorado sets the bar higher, by definition fewer students will be proficient. For me, the gaps are much more alarming than whatever level we apply to children’s performance. I think that the concern is in the inequity, not the label?

Van, this is a long post. You may disagree with much of what I said here, and who knows if you even read through to the end or not. But if you did, let me close with this: I think that you and I both have a similar passion for equity in schools, and I also think that we both have a passion for making school different, particularly for historically-marginalized children and families. I might be wrong, but I don’t think so. Given your work with DSST and The Odyssey School of Denver and my work around instructional redesign and leadership for deeper learning, I think that we might have a really interesting and productive conversation together. Let me know if you ever want to have a meetup. I’m happy to join you for lunch or coffee at whatever location is easy for you.

Thanks in advance if you actually read through all of this. Hope we get a chance to talk sometime.

SCOTT

Time To Teach reviews each blog post by our contributors but if you feel this is a blog post better suited for another page please let us know. Teachers and Educators are our heroes. We want to thank you for the work you do! Yours In Education! Time To Teach

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Those fake active shooter calls to schools? A similar thing happened before

We believe in thanking our sources! This post was sourced from the following blog/website: https://www.npr.org/2022/10/24/1129919258/swatting-fake-school-shooter-calls-hoax-pattern

The following is a new blog post related to education and teaching and relevant to our website visitors. The blog post is not based on the opinions or values of our company but is related to education and teaching, so we wanted to share it with YOU! If you ever have any questions please let us know. Now… on to the post!

Police officers respond to a call that an active shooter had reportedly injured 24 students at Chillicothe High School in Chillicothe, Ohio, in September. The call turned out to be a hoax. Similar scenes have played out at schools across the country in recent weeks.

As schools across the U.S. are targeted by false calls about active shooters, NPR has found evidence that a similar scheme took place in the spring.

(Image credit: Chillicothe Police Department/Screenshot by NPR)

Time To Teach reviews each blog post by our contributors but if you feel this is a blog post better suited for another page please let us know. Teachers and Educators are our heroes. We want to thank you for the work you do! Yours In Education! Time To Teach

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Appeals court temporarily blocks Biden's student debt relief plan

We believe in thanking our sources! This post was sourced from the following blog/website: https://www.npr.org/2022/10/21/1130748329/appeals-court-temporarily-blocks-bidens-student-debt-relief-plan

The following is a new blog post related to education and teaching and relevant to our website visitors. The blog post is not based on the opinions or values of our company but is related to education and teaching, so we wanted to share it with YOU! If you ever have any questions please let us know. Now… on to the post!

The 8th Circuit Court of Appeals has temporarily blocked President Biden's student debt relief plan. Prior to the ruling, applications were on track to process and erase the debt as soon as Sunday.

Time To Teach reviews each blog post by our contributors but if you feel this is a blog post better suited for another page please let us know. Teachers and Educators are our heroes. We want to thank you for the work you do! Yours In Education! Time To Teach

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A federal court of appeals has temporarily blocked Biden's student loan debt relief plan

We believe in thanking our sources! This post was sourced from the following blog/website: https://www.npr.org/2022/10/22/1130725593/a-federal-court-of-appeals-has-temporarily-blocked-bidens-student-loan-debt-reli

The following is a new blog post related to education and teaching and relevant to our website visitors. The blog post is not based on the opinions or values of our company but is related to education and teaching, so we wanted to share it with YOU! If you ever have any questions please let us know. Now… on to the post!

The U.S. 8th court of appeals has temporarily blocked President Biden's student loan debt relief plan.

Time To Teach reviews each blog post by our contributors but if you feel this is a blog post better suited for another page please let us know. Teachers and Educators are our heroes. We want to thank you for the work you do! Yours In Education! Time To Teach

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Biden's student debt relief plan is temporarily blocked. Here's what you need to know.

We believe in thanking our sources! This post was sourced from the following blog/website: https://www.npr.org/2022/10/22/1130735004/student-loan-debt-relief-blocked-biden-court

The following is a new blog post related to education and teaching and relevant to our website visitors. The blog post is not based on the opinions or values of our company but is related to education and teaching, so we wanted to share it with YOU! If you ever have any questions please let us know. Now… on to the post!

President Biden speaks about student debt relief at Delaware State University in Dover on Friday.

Nearly 22 million people — more than half of qualifying borrowers — have signed up. The Biden administration says it is continuing to accept and review applications during the temporary hold.

(Image credit: Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images)

Time To Teach reviews each blog post by our contributors but if you feel this is a blog post better suited for another page please let us know. Teachers and Educators are our heroes. We want to thank you for the work you do! Yours In Education! Time To Teach

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A Planning Guide For Project-Based Learning In The Elementary Classroom

We believe in thanking our sources! This post was sourced from the following blog/website: https://www.teachthought.com/pedagogy/project-based-learning-template-elementary/

The following is a new blog post related to education and teaching and relevant to our website visitors. The blog post is not based on the opinions or values of our company but is related to education and teaching, so we wanted to share it with YOU! If you ever have any questions please let us know. Now… on to the post!

This planning template for project-based learning in the elementary school classroom includes both a blank and completed example.

The post A Planning Guide For Project-Based Learning In The Elementary Classroom appeared first on TeachThought.

Time To Teach reviews each blog post by our contributors but if you feel this is a blog post better suited for another page please let us know. Teachers and Educators are our heroes. We want to thank you for the work you do! Yours In Education! Time To Teach

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A high school student's mural angers parents over what they say are hidden messages

We believe in thanking our sources! This post was sourced from the following blog/website: https://www.npr.org/2022/10/20/1129786060/student-school-mural-angers-parents-hidden-messages-michigan-lgbtq-satan

The following is a new blog post related to education and teaching and relevant to our website visitors. The blog post is not based on the opinions or values of our company but is related to education and teaching, so we wanted to share it with YOU! If you ever have any questions please let us know. Now… on to the post!

Debate over the mural's meaning became heated during a school board meeting last week. Parents say the painting contains anti-Christian and demonic messages, while also being pro-LGBTQ.

(Image credit: 13 On Your Side, an ABC affiliate station )

Time To Teach reviews each blog post by our contributors but if you feel this is a blog post better suited for another page please let us know. Teachers and Educators are our heroes. We want to thank you for the work you do! Yours In Education! Time To Teach

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Congratulations, Shane Saeed!

We believe in thanking our sources! This post was sourced from the following blog/website: http://dangerouslyirrelevant.org/2022/10/congratulations-shane-saeed.html

The following is a new blog post related to education and teaching and relevant to our website visitors. The blog post is not based on the opinions or values of our company but is related to education and teaching, so we wanted to share it with YOU! If you ever have any questions please let us know. Now… on to the post!

I nominated one of my doctoral students here at the University of Colorado Denver for a national award. And… she was selected!

Congratulations, Shane Saeed, for being named to the 2022 Class of ASCD’s Emerging Leaders. Well deserved! 

2022 ASCD Emerging Leaders

Time To Teach reviews each blog post by our contributors but if you feel this is a blog post better suited for another page please let us know. Teachers and Educators are our heroes. We want to thank you for the work you do! Yours In Education! Time To Teach

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Passage of the Child Nutrition Bill

We believe in thanking our sources! This post was sourced from the following blog/website: http://www.ed.gov/news/press-releases/statement-us-secretary-education-duncan-passage-childhood-nutrition-bill

The following is a new blog post related to education and teaching and relevant to our website visitors. The blog post is not based on the opinions or values of our company but is related to education and teaching, so we wanted to share it with YOU! If you ever have any questions please let us know. Now… on to the post!

The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act will "help schools fight our country's childhood obesity epidemic and give students access to the nutritional food they need to help them learn," Secretary Duncan said.

Time To Teach reviews each blog post by our contributors but if you feel this is a blog post better suited for another page please let us know. Teachers and Educators are our heroes. We want to thank you for the work you do! Yours In Education! Time To Teach

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Yeshiva University cancels all clubs after it was ordered to allow an LGBTQ group

We believe in thanking our sources! This post was sourced from the following blog/website: https://www.npr.org/2022/09/17/1123638157/supreme-court-yeshiva-university-lgbtq-club

The following is a new blog post related to education and teaching and relevant to our website visitors. The blog post is not based on the opinions or values of our company but is related to education and teaching, so we wanted to share it with YOU! If you ever have any questions please let us know. Now… on to the post!

People walk by the campus of Yeshiva University in New York City on Aug. 30. The school told students in an email that it was pausing all student clubs on campus.

The Supreme Court said Yeshiva University would have to go back to New York state courts in its legal battle with the YU Pride Alliance, an LGBTQ student group asking to be officially recognized.

(Image credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Time To Teach reviews each blog post by our contributors but if you feel this is a blog post better suited for another page please let us know. Teachers and Educators are our heroes. We want to thank you for the work you do! Yours In Education! Time To Teach

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